Claudette Colvin: Twice Toward Justice by Phillip M. Hoose

Claudette Colvin: Twice Toward Justice - Phillip M. Hoose

Rosa Parks was not the first woman to refuse to give up her seat on a bus for a white person. I know, I didn’t know this either. It’s not our fault. Claudette Colvin had done the same nine months before. She was not considered by African American civil rights leaders to be a suitable symbol for the campaign against segregationist legislation. She was too young (she was fifteen), perceived to be too fiesty and too emotional, and too working class to be an appropriate figurehead to inspire revolution among her fellow African American residents of Montgomery, Alabama. She suffered more at the hands of the police than Ms. Parks (Colvin was jailed, among other things), more scorn from her neighbours and supposed friends than Ms. Parks, and yet she’s been conveniently forgotten by the press, the historians and the public.

 

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Source: http://literaryames.wordpress.com/2014/08/10/claudette-colvin-twice-toward-justice-by-phillip-m-hoose